LRD Booklets September 2016

Supporting pregnant workers - a union reps guide

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Introduction

Introduction
 [pages 5-6] (523 words)

Despite steady improvements in rights for working parents in recent years, pregnant workers and those returning to work face huge problems in terms ...
Open access

Chapter 1

1. The problems faced by pregnant workers and returning mothers
 [ch 1: page 7] (51 words)

Pregnant workers and mothers returning to the workplace after maternity leave face a whole range of problems and challenges, ranging from negative or ...
Subscribers only

Negative treatment by employers
 [ch 1: pages 7-8] (517 words)

Some groups fare worse than others
 [ch 1: pages 8-9] (333 words)

Negative effects on employment, pay and pensions
 [ch 1: pages 9-10] (516 words)

Inflexible working
 [ch 1: page 10] (115 words)

Proposed social policy changes
 [ch 1: pages 10-11] (259 words)

The impact of funding cuts and tribunal fees
 [ch 1: page 11] (78 words)

Cuts to the EHRC
 [ch 1: page 11] (199 words)

Tribunal fees
 [ch 1: pages 12-13] (738 words)

Inadequate tribunal remedies
 [ch 1: page 13] (187 words)

Chapter 2

2. Discrimination against new and expectant mothers – the law
 [ch 1: page 14] (524 words)

This Chapter summarises the basic laws available to protect pregnant workers and women on maternity leave from discrimination at work. Found in the ...
Subscribers only

Pregnancy and maternity discrimination
 [ch 2: pages 15-17] (914 words)

Sex discrimination
 [ch 2: pages 18-19] (629 words)

Checklist of useful evidence
 [ch 2: pages 19-20] (637 words)

Women undertaking IVF
 [ch 2: pages 21-22] (544 words)

Surrogacy
 [ch 2: pages 22-23] (414 words)

Indirect sex discrimination
 [ch 2: pages 23-24] (446 words)

Harassment
 [ch 2: page 24] (290 words)

Victimisation
 [ch 2: page 25] (157 words)

Compensation
 [ch 2: page 25] (71 words)

Time limit
 [ch 2: page 25] (117 words)

Claims against individual discriminators and harassers
 [ch 2: page 25] (37 words)

Chapter 3

3. Negative treatment faced by pregnant workers – the law in practice
 [ch 3: page 26] (124 words)

This Chapter looks at some of the common workplace situations and topics that have given rise to problems for pregnant workers and returning mothers ...
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Job applicants
 [ch 3: pages 26-27] (688 words)

Sickness absence
 [ch 3: pages 27-28] (94 words)

Sick pay
 [ch 3: page 28] (236 words)

Pregnancy-related absence
 [ch 3: pages 28-30] (654 words)

Miscarriage and stillbirth
 [ch 3: page 30] (93 words)

Information and consultation issues
 [ch 3: pages 30-31] (649 words)

Performance appraisal, training, promotion
 [ch 3: page 31] (162 words)

Working hours and work arrangements
 [ch 3: pages 32-34] (1,211 words)

The statutory flexible working regime
 [ch 3: pages 34-36] (660 words)

Contract terms and conditions during leave
 [ch 3: pages 36-37] (261 words)

Holidays
 [ch 3: pages 37-38] (463 words)

Bank holidays
 [ch 3: page 38] (168 words)

Breastfeeding at work
 [ch 3: pages 38-39] (317 words)

Breastfeeding facilities
 [ch 3: page 39] (207 words)

Breaks to breastfeed
 [ch 3: pages 39-40] (222 words)

Unfair dismissal and parental rights
 [ch 3: pages 40-41] (577 words)

Redundancy
 [ch 3: pages 41-42] (240 words)

Redundancy consultation
 [ch 3: page 42] (219 words)

Redundancy selection
 [ch 3: pages 42-43] (272 words)

Selection criteria
 [ch 3: page 43] (290 words)

Enhanced right to be offered a suitable available vacancy
 [ch 3: pages 44-46] (1,060 words)

Fixed-term employees and redundancy
 [ch 3: page 46] (220 words)

Career breaks
 [ch 3: pages 46-47] (404 words)

Chapter 4

4. Health, safety and welfare
 [ch 4: pages 48-50] (1,309 words)

Recent research by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found a shocking 41% of women reporting a risk to their health, safety and welfare ...
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What are the risks?
 [ch 4: pages 51-52] (586 words)

Ionising radiation
 [ch 4: page 52] (94 words)

Working with Display Screen Equipment (DSE)
 [ch 4: page 52] (69 words)

The right to a maternity suspension
 [ch 4: page 53] (440 words)

Night work
 [ch 4: page 54] (233 words)

Chapter 5

5. Time off for antenatal and adoption appointments
 [ch 5: page 55] (215 words)

There is an entitlement to paid time off for antenatal appointments for:
 ...
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Time off for partners to accompany pregnant women
 [ch 5: pages 55-56] (220 words)

Time off for prospective adoptees
 [ch 5: page 56] (174 words)

Intended surrogate parents
 [ch 5: page 56] (209 words)

Chapter 6

6. Leave and pay rights
 [ch 6: page 57] (311 words)

This Chapter sets out the minimum statutory rights to leave and pay available to working parents.
 ...
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Statutory maternity leave
 [ch 6: pages 57-59] (696 words)

Statutory adoption leave
 [ch 6: pages 59-60] (369 words)

Shared parental leave
 [ch 6: pages 60-62] (911 words)

Ordinary paternity leave
 [ch 6: page 62] (101 words)

Unpaid parental leave
 [ch 6: page 62] (162 words)

Unpaid leave for family emergencies
 [ch 6: pages 62-63] (148 words)

Statutory rights to pay while on leave
 [ch 6: page 63] (176 words)

Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP)
 [ch 6: pages 63-64] (244 words)

Statutory Adoption Pay (SAP)
 [ch 6: page 64] (130 words)

Statutory Shared Parental Pay (SSPP)
 [ch 6: page 64] (75 words)

Statutory Paternity Pay
 [ch 6: page 64] (33 words)

Keeping in touch days
 [ch 6: pages 64-65] (211 words)

Rights during leave
 [ch 6: page 65] (60 words)

Returning to work
 [ch 6: page 65] (64 words)

Returning after ordinary maternity or adoption leave
 [ch 6: page 65] (88 words)

Returning after additional maternity or adoption leave
 [ch 6: page 65] (95 words)

Shared parental leave
 [ch 6: pages 65-66] (335 words)

Chapter 7

7. Union action at the workplace
 [ch 7: pages 67] (271 words)

Despite the existence of legal rights in relation to pregnancy and maternity, the evidence (set out in Chapter 1 of this booklet) shows that ...
Subscribers only

Showing the benefits of unions
 [ch 7: pages 67-68] (342 words)

Collective bargaining for pregnancy and maternity rights
 [ch 7: page 68] (88 words)

Areas for negotiation
 [ch 7: pages 68-70] (1,123 words)

Collective agreements on the LRD Payline database show “union effect”
 [ch 7: pages 70-71] (403 words)

Other benefits of resolving issues collectively
 [ch 7: pages 72-73] (268 words)

Ways to get employers to act
 [ch 7: page 73] (184 words)

Using statutory information rights
 [ch 7: page 74] (224 words)

Using the safety committee
 [ch 7: pages 74-75] (225 words)

Using the Public Sector Equality Duty
 [ch 7: page 75] (276 words)

The right to ask questions about suspected discrimination
 [ch 7: pages 75-76] (215 words)

Chapter 8

8. The wider campaign on pregnancy at work
 [ch 8: pages 77-78] (444 words)

Many of the women who suffer from the worst levels of pregnancy and maternity discrimination are in workplaces where unions are not recognised (see ...
Subscribers only

The EU dimension
 [ch 8: page 78] (210 words)

Further information

Further information
 [pages 79-80 (683 words)

Copies of relevant laws and regulations can be obtained online at: www.legislation.gov.uk. ...
Subscribers only