LRD Booklets February 2018

Tackling sexual harassment at work - a guide for union reps

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Introduction

Introduction [pages 3-4] (897 words)

Sexual harassment can happen to anyone at any time, in any place. All too often this sort of behaviour has been laughed off by perpetrators as a ...
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Chapter 1

1. The scale of the problem [ch 1: pages 5-6] (479 words)

The Equality Act 2010 defines sexual harassment as “unwanted conduct of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of violating someone’s ...
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Who is affected by sexual harassment [ch 1: page 6] (179 words)

Third party harassment [ch 1: pages 6-7] (112 words)

Where is it most prevalent? [ch 1: page 7] (223 words)

Ethnic minorities [ch 1: page 7] (57 words)

Male-dominated sectors [ch 1: page 7] (79 words)

Politics [ch 1: page 8] (286 words)

Local government [ch 1: pages 8-9] (299 words)

The arts [ch 1: page 9] (225 words)

Education [ch 1: page 10] (222 words)

Hospitality [ch 1: pages 10-11] (337 words)

What classifies as workplace sexual harassment? [ch 1: page 11] (181 words)

Why is it a serious issue? [ch 1: page 12] (136 words)

Why is it a union issue? [ch 1: page 12] (238 words)

Under-reporting [ch 1: page 12] (249 words)

UCU checklist for members on what to do if they are being sexually harassed [ch 1: page 13] (156 words)

Chapter 2

2. The law [ch 2: pages 14-15] (409 words)

Workers have legal rights to protection from sexual harassment through the Equality Act 2010 (EA 10). Criminal and other laws (including health and ...
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Sexual harassment at work and the Equality Act 2010 [ch 2: page 15] (171 words)

Who is protected? [ch 2: pages 15-16] (271 words)

What rights does the Equality Act 2010 provide? [ch 2: pages 16-19] (1,601 words)

The employer’s legal liability for sexual harassment under the Equality Act 2010 [ch 2: pages 19-20] (447 words)

What are ‘reasonable steps’? [ch 2: pages 20-22] (759 words)

What about sexual harassment by ‘non-employees’ under the organisation’s control? [ch 2: pages 22-23] (464 words)

What about sexual harassment by third parties? [ch 2: pages 23-24] (358 words)

Tribunal remedies for sexual harassment [ch 2: page 24] (281 words)

Historic allegations [ch 2: page 25] (159 words)

The EU perspective [ch 2: pages 25-27] (761 words)

Chapter 3

3. Changing the workplace culture [ch 3: page 28] (193 words)

While there has been a massive amount of media coverage of sexual harassment recently, considerable action is required to achieve a permanent shift ...
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Publicising policies [ch 3: page 28] (134 words)

Campaigns [ch 3: pages 28-29] (187 words)

Surveys [ch 3: pages 29-30] (408 words)

UNISON’s model survey [ch 3: page 31] (203 words)

Training [ch 3: pages 30-32] (272 words)

Working with others [ch 3: page 32] (90 words)

European Trade Union Confederation’s recommendations [ch 3: pages 32-33] (338 words)

Chapter 4

4. Drawing up a policy to deal with sexual harassment at work [ch 4: page 34] (253 words)

The single most important thing a rep can do when it comes to tackling sexual harassment is to ensure that there are good workplace policies in place ...
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Trade union involvement [ch 4: page 34] (76 words)

Contents [ch 4: pages 34-35] (315 words)

Commitment [ch 4: page 35] (99 words)

Disciplinary offence [ch 4: page 35] (66 words)

Definition and examples [ch 4: page 35] (201 words)

Reporting channels [ch 4: page 36] (80 words)

Informal and formal resolution [ch 4: page 37] (283 words)

Outcomes [ch 4: pages 37-38] (202 words)

Support and advice [ch 4: page 38 ] (154 words)

Implementation [ch 4: page 38] (107 words)

Chapter 5

5. Representing members [ch 5: page 39] (183 words)

A union rep can provide a reassuring presence for the complainant. Members who have taken the decision to come forward can be feeling frightened or ...
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Representing a member reporting sexual harassment [ch 5: pages 39-41] (619 words)

Access to counselling [ch 5: page 41] (62 words)

Contacting the police [ch 5: page 41] (96 words)

Initial informal approach [ch 5: page 41] (25 words)

Formal approach [ch 5: pages 41-43] (597 words)

Redeployment [ch 5: page 43] (170 words)

Representing both sides [ch 5: page 43] (119 words)

Representing an alleged harasser [ch 5: pages 44-45] (554 words)

Practical support [ch 5: page 45] (202 words)

Dealing with formal allegations of sexual harassment [ch 5: pages 45-46] (227 words)

What if the harasser is a union officer or rep? [ch 5: page 46] (105 words)

Investigations [ch 5: pages 46-47] (606 words)

Evidence [ch 5: page 48] (366 words)

Suspension [ch 5: pages 48-49] (458 words)

Disciplinary hearings [ch 5: pages 49-50] (66 words)

Sanctions [ch 5: page 50] (242 words)

Model procedure to deal with complaints of sexual harassment [ch 5: pages 51-54] (858 words)

Further information

Further information [page 55] (363 words)

Acas, Acas National, Euston Tower, 286 Euston Road, London, NW1 3JJ. Acas helpline: 0300 123 1100 available Monday to Friday 8am-6pm; www.acas.org.uk. ...
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